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Career of San Francisco boxer Frankie Klick

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Career of San Francisco boxer Frankie Klick
Item Details
Description
Heading: (Boxing)
Author:
Title: Scrapbook recording the career of boxer Frankie Klick, onetime World Jr. Lightweight champion
Place Published: Various places
Publisher:
Date Published: 1927-1931
Description:

18 leaves, on both sides are pasted telegrams, news clippings, letters, etc., with the original signed contract for a 1927 bout signed by Klick. 38.5x26 cm (15¼x10¼"), modern half leather and cloth.

Original material documenting about four years of the career of San Francisco boxer Frankie Klick (1907-1982), evidently gathered by his manager Joe Doran, with nearly all of the telegrams in the collection sent to Doran, setting up boxing matches with Frankie Klick. Also included is a typed list of Klick's fights with results. Klick was quite well-known on the West Coast at this time, but had less renown in the east, as indicated by an original 1927 typed letter to Doran signed by promoter Roderick "Jess" McMahon Sr. (father of wrestling entrepreneur Vince McMahon). "There is very little known here about your man, and as far as a featherweight elimination tournament is concerned, there is none contemplated in Madison Sq. Garden..." Most of the telegrams are in the vein of "Will give Klick fifteen percent to box Harold next Wednesday evening answer phone or wire. Louis Parente." There are two original promotional photographs in the archive, and a few of the numerous newspaper clippings contain sketches of "Frankie Klick, Joe Doran's Flashy Featherweight." In addition, there is a 1943 Madison Square Garden boxing program with the Jake LaMotta fight. A unique and revealing glimpse into the world of boxing in the 1920's.

Frankie Klick (May 5, 1907 - May 18, 1982) was an American boxer who became a World Jr. Lightweight boxing champion when he defeated "Kid Chocolate", on December 25, 1933 at the arena in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a seventh-round technical knockout. In his career he fought the exceptional champions Henry Armstrong once, Barney Ross twice and Tony Canzoneri four times. His managers were Joe Doran and Ray Carlin. Early life and career Frank Klich was born on May 5, 1907 in San Francisco, California. Klick, as he became known when a promoter of one of his early bouts misspelled his name, began his interest in boxing when an older brother gifted him with a pair of boxing gloves when he was nine years old. From October 9, 1924 to April 22, 1927, Klick fought twenty-seven times in San Francisco's National Hall or Dreamland Rink. He won all but one of his first twenty-seven bouts, as one was a draw. Impressively eight of his twenty-seven early wins were by knockout or technical knockout.[1] On January 28, 1927 Klick defeated California Joe Lynch, a well respected West Coast boxer, for the first time at Dreamland Rink in San Francisco in a six-round points decision. On March 23, 1928, Klick defeated California Joe Lynch again in a four-round points decision at the State Armory in San Francisco. He would fight Lynch twice more in ten round draws. Loss to Joe Murphy In his first loss, and very likely his first knockout, Klick was defeated by Dynamite Joe Murphy in the fourth round at the Auditorium in Oakland, California on June 1, 1927. A left hook to the head dropped Klick to the canvas for a count of eight, and when he arose another attack landed him on the canvas for the full count. Marriage in May 1928 At the age of twenty-one, Klick was married to Cecelia McCarthy on May 6, 1928. The marriage lasted seven years and produced two children Patricia, and Frankie Jr., but ended in divorce on June 5, 1935. On May 18, 1932, Klick tried unsuccessfully to take the USA California State Lightweight Title, but was defeated by Young Peter Jackson in a ten-round points decision at the Golden Gate Arena in San Francisco California. Taking the World Jr. Lightweight Championship against Kid Chocolate Before a crowd of 4,000, Klick took the World Jr. Lightweight boxing champion against Kid Chocolate, on December 25, 1933 at the Arena in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a seventh-round technical knockout. The Ludington Daily News, wrote "The flashy Cuban "bon bon" (Chocolate) was bereft of the title in the seventh round of a scheduled fifteen round Christmas Day bout by a whistling right smash to the chin and all he got in exchange was the second knockout of his career although the latest was of the technical variety." The bout had been fairly close until the seventh with Chocolate showing stamina and style. The seventh round had gone two minutes and fifty-eight seconds when the knockout occurred. "The Cuban waged a fast, aggressive fight in the early rounds that gave him a temporary lead." Chocolate had landed rights "to the head and body," but may have lacked the stamina to stay with Klick. Chocolate may have been suffering from a knockout he had received from Tony Canzoneri only a month previously. He retained his featherweight championship at least in the state of New York.
Condition
Varying amounts of wear, as may be expected, some staining; very good.
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Career of San Francisco boxer Frankie Klick

Estimate $700 - $1,000
Aug 06, 2020
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Starting Price $350
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0012: Career of San Francisco boxer Frankie Klick

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Est. $700 - $1,000Starting Price $350
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Aug 06, 2020 2:00 PM EDT
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Lot 0012 Details

Description
...
Heading: (Boxing)
Author:
Title: Scrapbook recording the career of boxer Frankie Klick, onetime World Jr. Lightweight champion
Place Published: Various places
Publisher:
Date Published: 1927-1931
Description:

18 leaves, on both sides are pasted telegrams, news clippings, letters, etc., with the original signed contract for a 1927 bout signed by Klick. 38.5x26 cm (15¼x10¼"), modern half leather and cloth.

Original material documenting about four years of the career of San Francisco boxer Frankie Klick (1907-1982), evidently gathered by his manager Joe Doran, with nearly all of the telegrams in the collection sent to Doran, setting up boxing matches with Frankie Klick. Also included is a typed list of Klick's fights with results. Klick was quite well-known on the West Coast at this time, but had less renown in the east, as indicated by an original 1927 typed letter to Doran signed by promoter Roderick "Jess" McMahon Sr. (father of wrestling entrepreneur Vince McMahon). "There is very little known here about your man, and as far as a featherweight elimination tournament is concerned, there is none contemplated in Madison Sq. Garden..." Most of the telegrams are in the vein of "Will give Klick fifteen percent to box Harold next Wednesday evening answer phone or wire. Louis Parente." There are two original promotional photographs in the archive, and a few of the numerous newspaper clippings contain sketches of "Frankie Klick, Joe Doran's Flashy Featherweight." In addition, there is a 1943 Madison Square Garden boxing program with the Jake LaMotta fight. A unique and revealing glimpse into the world of boxing in the 1920's.

Frankie Klick (May 5, 1907 - May 18, 1982) was an American boxer who became a World Jr. Lightweight boxing champion when he defeated "Kid Chocolate", on December 25, 1933 at the arena in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a seventh-round technical knockout. In his career he fought the exceptional champions Henry Armstrong once, Barney Ross twice and Tony Canzoneri four times. His managers were Joe Doran and Ray Carlin. Early life and career Frank Klich was born on May 5, 1907 in San Francisco, California. Klick, as he became known when a promoter of one of his early bouts misspelled his name, began his interest in boxing when an older brother gifted him with a pair of boxing gloves when he was nine years old. From October 9, 1924 to April 22, 1927, Klick fought twenty-seven times in San Francisco's National Hall or Dreamland Rink. He won all but one of his first twenty-seven bouts, as one was a draw. Impressively eight of his twenty-seven early wins were by knockout or technical knockout.[1] On January 28, 1927 Klick defeated California Joe Lynch, a well respected West Coast boxer, for the first time at Dreamland Rink in San Francisco in a six-round points decision. On March 23, 1928, Klick defeated California Joe Lynch again in a four-round points decision at the State Armory in San Francisco. He would fight Lynch twice more in ten round draws. Loss to Joe Murphy In his first loss, and very likely his first knockout, Klick was defeated by Dynamite Joe Murphy in the fourth round at the Auditorium in Oakland, California on June 1, 1927. A left hook to the head dropped Klick to the canvas for a count of eight, and when he arose another attack landed him on the canvas for the full count. Marriage in May 1928 At the age of twenty-one, Klick was married to Cecelia McCarthy on May 6, 1928. The marriage lasted seven years and produced two children Patricia, and Frankie Jr., but ended in divorce on June 5, 1935. On May 18, 1932, Klick tried unsuccessfully to take the USA California State Lightweight Title, but was defeated by Young Peter Jackson in a ten-round points decision at the Golden Gate Arena in San Francisco California. Taking the World Jr. Lightweight Championship against Kid Chocolate Before a crowd of 4,000, Klick took the World Jr. Lightweight boxing champion against Kid Chocolate, on December 25, 1933 at the Arena in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a seventh-round technical knockout. The Ludington Daily News, wrote "The flashy Cuban "bon bon" (Chocolate) was bereft of the title in the seventh round of a scheduled fifteen round Christmas Day bout by a whistling right smash to the chin and all he got in exchange was the second knockout of his career although the latest was of the technical variety." The bout had been fairly close until the seventh with Chocolate showing stamina and style. The seventh round had gone two minutes and fifty-eight seconds when the knockout occurred. "The Cuban waged a fast, aggressive fight in the early rounds that gave him a temporary lead." Chocolate had landed rights "to the head and body," but may have lacked the stamina to stay with Klick. Chocolate may have been suffering from a knockout he had received from Tony Canzoneri only a month previously. He retained his featherweight championship at least in the state of New York.
Condition
...
Varying amounts of wear, as may be expected, some staining; very good.

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