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Framed Mid 18th C. Cuzco School Painting, St. Augustine

item-54105683=1
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Framed Mid 18th C. Cuzco School Painting, St. Augustine

Lot 0269A Details

Description
Spanish Colonial, Peru, Cuzco School, ca. 1750 CE. A very large, framed, oil-on-canvas painting with liberal gold leaf details depicting St. Augustine of Hippo held up by angels as he swoons while having a vision. Augustine is depicted middle aged and beardless, dressed as a bishop in elaborate gold embroidered garments, and holding a crozier, with his writing table to the right. In the upper right corner are two winged angels and a central nude, cherubic child who stands for Christ, of his vision. On the lower right is a cross-topped pomegranate, the Christian symbol of the Resurrection inspired by the classical association with Proserpine who would return each spring to regenerate the earth. Its many seeds in one fruit made it a symbol of unity of many under one - the Church. Sometimes shown held by the infant Christ, it is also a Resurrection symbol. Note that the red vessel on the table is actually shaped like a pomegranate. Mounted in gold leaf wood frame of elegantly ornate design (frame dates later than the painting). Size: 59.5" L x 40.25" W (151.1 cm x 102.2 cm); 65" L x 47" W (165.1 cm x 119.4 cm) framed

The Vision of St. Augustine (Augustine also known as Bishop of Hippo in North Africa - one of the four Latin Fathers and perhaps the Church's most esteemed and influential theologians) is a popular legend that first emerged in 15th century art and became increasingly popular in the 16th and 17th centuries. The vision narrative tells of Augustine walking along the shore, meditating upon the Trinity, when he came upon a child who had made a hole in the sand. Using a shell, the child was vainly attempting to fill the hole with water. When Augustine stated that this task was futile the child replied, "No more so than for a human intelligence to fathom the mystery you are meditating." The attention to details and the intense drama of the iconography is so impressive. Although the fainting scene is overtly theatrical, there are subtle devices used by the artist as well. Note, for example, how the angel wearing the red robe with lace trimmed sheer white gossamer layers beneath standing on the left looks out beyond the picture plane, as if inviting the viewer to experience the scene.

The Cuzco School (Escuela Cuzquena) was a Roman Catholic artistic tradition which originated following the 1534 Spanish Conquest of the Inca Empire and continued during the Colonial Period in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Though based in Cusco, Peru (the former capital of the Inca Empire), the Cuzco School extended to other cities of the Andes, present day Bolivia, and Ecuador. Today it is regarded as the first artistic center that taught European visual art techniques in the Americas. The primary intention of Cuzco School paintings was to be didactic. Hoping to convert the Incas to Catholicism, the Spanish sent religious artists to Cusco who created a school for the Quechua peoples and mestizos. Interestingly, Cusquena art was created by the indigenous as well as Spanish creoles. In addition to religious subjects, the Cuzco School expressed their cultural pride with paintings of Inca monarchs. Despite the fact that Cuzco School painters had studied prints of Flemish, Byzantine, and Italian Renaissance art, these artists' style and techniques were generally freer than that of their European models.

Provenance: ex- private Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA collection

All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience.

#124493
Condition
One can see the old stretcher marks on the verso, new wood supports all around peripheries. Several old repairs evident - on verso one can see two patched areas at the bottom, one at the center, and one at the upper right. All the way down the right side is a seam. The piece was relined at the periphery; see a small loss at upper right. The painting shows minor surface wear and faint losses, overall it is very strong with vivid pigments. Frame is in excellent condition.
Buyer's Premium
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Framed Mid 18th C. Cuzco School Painting, St. Augustine

Estimate $9,000 - $15,000
Jun 29, 2017
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Artemis Gallery

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0269A: Framed Mid 18th C. Cuzco School Painting, St. Augustine

Lot Passed
0 Bids
Est. $9,000 - $15,000Starting Price $5,500
DAY 2: Pre-Columbian, Tribal, Colonial Art
Thu, Jun 29, 2017 10:00 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 24.5%

Lot 0269A Details

Description
...
Spanish Colonial, Peru, Cuzco School, ca. 1750 CE. A very large, framed, oil-on-canvas painting with liberal gold leaf details depicting St. Augustine of Hippo held up by angels as he swoons while having a vision. Augustine is depicted middle aged and beardless, dressed as a bishop in elaborate gold embroidered garments, and holding a crozier, with his writing table to the right. In the upper right corner are two winged angels and a central nude, cherubic child who stands for Christ, of his vision. On the lower right is a cross-topped pomegranate, the Christian symbol of the Resurrection inspired by the classical association with Proserpine who would return each spring to regenerate the earth. Its many seeds in one fruit made it a symbol of unity of many under one - the Church. Sometimes shown held by the infant Christ, it is also a Resurrection symbol. Note that the red vessel on the table is actually shaped like a pomegranate. Mounted in gold leaf wood frame of elegantly ornate design (frame dates later than the painting). Size: 59.5" L x 40.25" W (151.1 cm x 102.2 cm); 65" L x 47" W (165.1 cm x 119.4 cm) framed

The Vision of St. Augustine (Augustine also known as Bishop of Hippo in North Africa - one of the four Latin Fathers and perhaps the Church's most esteemed and influential theologians) is a popular legend that first emerged in 15th century art and became increasingly popular in the 16th and 17th centuries. The vision narrative tells of Augustine walking along the shore, meditating upon the Trinity, when he came upon a child who had made a hole in the sand. Using a shell, the child was vainly attempting to fill the hole with water. When Augustine stated that this task was futile the child replied, "No more so than for a human intelligence to fathom the mystery you are meditating." The attention to details and the intense drama of the iconography is so impressive. Although the fainting scene is overtly theatrical, there are subtle devices used by the artist as well. Note, for example, how the angel wearing the red robe with lace trimmed sheer white gossamer layers beneath standing on the left looks out beyond the picture plane, as if inviting the viewer to experience the scene.

The Cuzco School (Escuela Cuzquena) was a Roman Catholic artistic tradition which originated following the 1534 Spanish Conquest of the Inca Empire and continued during the Colonial Period in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Though based in Cusco, Peru (the former capital of the Inca Empire), the Cuzco School extended to other cities of the Andes, present day Bolivia, and Ecuador. Today it is regarded as the first artistic center that taught European visual art techniques in the Americas. The primary intention of Cuzco School paintings was to be didactic. Hoping to convert the Incas to Catholicism, the Spanish sent religious artists to Cusco who created a school for the Quechua peoples and mestizos. Interestingly, Cusquena art was created by the indigenous as well as Spanish creoles. In addition to religious subjects, the Cuzco School expressed their cultural pride with paintings of Inca monarchs. Despite the fact that Cuzco School painters had studied prints of Flemish, Byzantine, and Italian Renaissance art, these artists' style and techniques were generally freer than that of their European models.

Provenance: ex- private Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA collection

All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience.

#124493
Condition
...
One can see the old stretcher marks on the verso, new wood supports all around peripheries. Several old repairs evident - on verso one can see two patched areas at the bottom, one at the center, and one at the upper right. All the way down the right side is a seam. The piece was relined at the periphery; see a small loss at upper right. The painting shows minor surface wear and faint losses, overall it is very strong with vivid pigments. Frame is in excellent condition.

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Louisville, CO 80027
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