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323: 1865 Comic Lithograph of Jefferson Davis

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323: 1865 Comic Lithograph of Jefferson Davis

Lot 0323 Details

Description
Civil War PrintsA CSA “President in Petticoats”, Comic Lithograph of Jefferson Davis

Very Rare, 1865 CSA President Jefferson Davis Comic Civil War Lithograph by Currier & Ives: “The Last Ditch of the Chivalry, Or a President in Petticoats”.
This fascinating and quite humorous stone lithograph is Medium Folio size and vignette. It measures approx. 17.5” x 13.5” overall including the generous margins that are present. When Richmond fell to the Union in the spring of 1865, Confederate President Jefferson Davis was forced to flee the city, along with his wife and his cabinet. The print is copyright 1865 and signed by Currier & Ives. It is framed in a period black painted wood frame with gold gilt liner. The lithograph in good condition with overall age toning and scattered fly specks. There is a 2"" tear that enters the print and the right side of the lower margin and some roughness in the margin at the lower left hand corner. A rare and fascinating, 1865 Jeff Davis Comic Civil War Currier & Ives, and an excellent addition to any collection.

According to the Federal cavalrymen who finally apprehended Davis on May 10 at Irwinsville, Georgia, he was dressed in his wife's clothing to evade capture. Davis, of course, told quite a different story, claiming to have picked up his wife's overcoat by mistake in the dark as he left their tent to investigate the sound of approaching horsemen. Varina Davis was said to have compounded the problem by throwing her shawl around his shoulders. Predictably, the press exploited this turn of events, which grew more exaggerated with the telling. The story in the North was that Davis had tried to evade capture by intentionally donning a female disguise. Inevitably the print market began producing images showing Davis at the point of capture ignominiously dressed in bonnet and skirts. In this cartoon, while Davis utters protests indicating that he is but a poor defenseless woman, a pursuing Union soldier shouts “It’s no use trying that shift, Jeff, we see your Boots!”

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323: 1865 Comic Lithograph of Jefferson Davis

Estimate $600 - $800
Feb 12, 2006
Starting Price $360
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0323: 323: 1865 Comic Lithograph of Jefferson Davis

Sold for $600
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Est. $600 - $800Starting Price $360
Autographs-Coins-Currency-Americana
Sun, Feb 12, 2006 11:00 AM
Buyer's Premium 22.5%

Lot 0323 Details

Description
...
Civil War PrintsA CSA “President in Petticoats”, Comic Lithograph of Jefferson Davis

Very Rare, 1865 CSA President Jefferson Davis Comic Civil War Lithograph by Currier & Ives: “The Last Ditch of the Chivalry, Or a President in Petticoats”.
This fascinating and quite humorous stone lithograph is Medium Folio size and vignette. It measures approx. 17.5” x 13.5” overall including the generous margins that are present. When Richmond fell to the Union in the spring of 1865, Confederate President Jefferson Davis was forced to flee the city, along with his wife and his cabinet. The print is copyright 1865 and signed by Currier & Ives. It is framed in a period black painted wood frame with gold gilt liner. The lithograph in good condition with overall age toning and scattered fly specks. There is a 2"" tear that enters the print and the right side of the lower margin and some roughness in the margin at the lower left hand corner. A rare and fascinating, 1865 Jeff Davis Comic Civil War Currier & Ives, and an excellent addition to any collection.

According to the Federal cavalrymen who finally apprehended Davis on May 10 at Irwinsville, Georgia, he was dressed in his wife's clothing to evade capture. Davis, of course, told quite a different story, claiming to have picked up his wife's overcoat by mistake in the dark as he left their tent to investigate the sound of approaching horsemen. Varina Davis was said to have compounded the problem by throwing her shawl around his shoulders. Predictably, the press exploited this turn of events, which grew more exaggerated with the telling. The story in the North was that Davis had tried to evade capture by intentionally donning a female disguise. Inevitably the print market began producing images showing Davis at the point of capture ignominiously dressed in bonnet and skirts. In this cartoon, while Davis utters protests indicating that he is but a poor defenseless woman, a pursuing Union soldier shouts “It’s no use trying that shift, Jeff, we see your Boots!”

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